ArticlesBlog

Report Card Summary (5-min. video)

Report Card Summary (5-min. video)


Welcome to this quick overview
of the school report card. We are going to move through
the summary page, or page one, of the school report card,
as you see here. Let’s begin with the top and move down
the left side of the report card. First, the report cards
serve many purposes and fulfill public, state,
and federal accountability requirements. Each year, school and district report cards
are released publicly on the DPI website. Anyone can view any school report card
or district report card in the state. Users can download and
save the report cards, too. They are PDF documents. Two versions are available
for each report card — a summary PDF, which is two pages, and
a detailed PDF, which is 18 to 20 pages. Report cards from
multiple years are online. School report cards are available
for the past three school years, and district report cards
for the past two. The State of Wisconsin box shows
the overall accountability score and corresponding rating. Each school receives an overall
accountability score from zero to 100. The overall accountability score
places the school in one of five rating categories ranging from
significantly exceeds expectations to fails to meet expectations. The zero-to-100 index
is not percent correct, so these scores are
never the same as grades. Attributing a letter grade to these
scores and ratings is a misinterpretation. The overall score is calculated
by combining the weighted average of the priority area scores, minus any
student engagement indicator deductions. We will review both the
priority area scores and the student engagement indicators
in a moment. You may ask why we use a weighted
average instead of a straight average. The reason a weighted average of
priority area scores is used is because Wisconsin schools
vary greatly in size, grade spans, and student populations,
and because not all schools have data
in all four priority areas. For example, high schools
do not have growth scores. So there’s no data
for that priority area. To account for this,
and to ensure that the scoring system is fair to all school types,
the average is weighted differently for schools that do not have scores
across all four priority areas. The bottom-left corner
of the report card displays basic demographic data
for the school. These data are not scores.
They are provided just for context. Please note, however,
that the performance of student groups is reported throughout
the detailed report card. For example, if you are interested in
how Hispanic students are performing in the school,
the performance of this student group will be reported throughout
the longer PDF report card. Now let’s take a look at
the right side of the report card. At the core of the report card
are the four priority areas. Schools receive a zero-to-100 score
for each priority area. The first priority area
is student achievement. Here we report students’ attainment
in reading and mathematics. Second is student growth,
which reports how rapidly students are gaining knowledge
and skills from year to year, focusing on the pace of improvement
in student performance. Third is closing gaps,
which reports how much the school is closing statewide achievement
gaps between student groups. In this priority area, we compare
low-income students, English language learners,
students with disabilities, and members of racial or ethnic groups
with their peers to see whether
achievement gaps are closing. The fourth and final priority area is
on track to graduation and post-secondary readiness. Here we report how well the school
is preparing students for graduation and
life after high school. The right column shows state scores
for comparison purposes only. They do not factor into
the accountability score rating. These scores allows users to compare
the school’s score to the statewide average. Below the priority areas, we see the
three student engagement indicators measuring chronic absenteeism,
test participation, and dropout rates. School and districts receive deductions for
each student engagement indicator not met. These deductions are subtracted
from the priority area’s weighted average and are reflected
in the overall accountability score. Finally, in the bottom right, we see
some trends in student achievement. These data are not part
of the accountability score or rating. Again, they are provided
just for information. The chart shows the school’s WKCE scores
in reading and mathematics for the past five years
alongside statewide performance. If you would like information on
the calculations used in the report cards, or for more explanatory guidance,
we have a number of resources available online, including
an interpretive guide, a technical guide,
and frequently asked questions. Don’t hesitate to contact us
with your report card questions. You can email us at
[email protected] or call the Office of Educational
Accountability at 608-267-1072. Thanks for watching.

Comment here