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Dobermann Dog Breed Guide

Dobermann Dog Breed Guide


I bought my wife a Doberman as a wedding present. We bred a couple of litters. It continued from there and we’ve been very successful ever since. The Doberman was originally bred as a protection dog for a tax collector, Louis Dobermann, many years ago lBack in Germany of course. They’re a very attractive dog but they do have this guarding temperament. So you should be aware of that if you’re going to introduce a Doberman into your family. They’re just a brilliant dog. Great company. Basically a one man dog – believe it or not. They will normally stick with one person as being the boss But, obviously will socialise with the rest of the family. They’re great pets. They are a reasonably large dog. I’m not saying they’re going to be a problem with children I’ve got an 11 year old son and he came along after we had the Dobermanns, And our dogs were absolutely fantastic with him. They only problem they could have caused with him is because they’re big, they could have knocked him over. Simple as that. The Dobermann is quite a smart dog. We’ve seen lots of them doing obedience andworking trials and things. It’s a very intelligent dog. It’s a very powerful dog. You need to think about doing lots of early training Using postive reward methods so you get all that power working with you. You need to train a Dobermann probably for the first two years of its life. They seem to be slow to mature But when mature and trained well they are a magnificent dog. Grooming is very minimal. They’re a short haired breed. They do moult as well. I won’t deny that. You can find little black hairs all over the place. But grooming, in essence, is very minimal. From a health point of view Dobermanns are susceptible to a thing called “Wobblers Syndrome” which means they have something wrong with the spine. So you want to be thinking about the equipment that you use for training. So possibly using a harness rather than a collar on its neck. Hip displasia used to be a large one (problem) and heart problems – caridomyopathy. Again, same as any other breed I believe – cancer. Anybody wanting to buy puppies, just make sure that the breeder has made the relevant health checks And they will be able to show you relevant health certificates from relevant people – vets and so forth – To prove that those checks have been carried out. The Dobermann is a fantastic breed. Very loyal. A great companion. If you want exercise, to go out running with, It’s a spot on dog to do it with.

Comments (3)

  1. a more healthy alternative would be the german pinscher, exactly the same dog in character, much healthier but smaller (about 50cm high)

  2. Thank you for this video as a Dobermann student my main concern is the preservation of the authentic Dobermann or what is left from it. The modern types are for me not recognizable as belonging to the Dobermann breed but everyone has his or her own personal flavour. What is far more concerning in my opinion is that the population as a whole is very unhealthy. As being a student from the breed since 2013 I have studied many pedigrees, been involved in projects, visit many lectures and it's a fact within the community that for example if it comes to DCM, there is in the whole world no bloodline free from it. DCM and Cancer are, besides the lack of working/protection mentalitty the two main health and dead problems/causes. There are two genetic diversity projects to involve with because the inbred figures are very high. I will not make my share to long but it's very painful to experience the need within the breed. A long term breeding management plan what includes introducing new blood, is necessary if we not want that it will become a vanishing race. Their genes are very valuable within the Canine species. Transparancy and proper education is important for everyone who has a passion for this noble breed. I like to share a link what could give maybe some better insight. My intention as being a owner and student from the breed is to inform the other side of the coin. https://www.instituteofcaninebiology.org/blog/are-preservation-breeders-preserving-the-doberman-no

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